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The topic of guilt, shame and embarrassment has been tackled by many, including experts with plenty of different suggestions for overcoming these three moral emotions. BUT, God has given us resolve over these emotions in the present of redemption, the process of reconciliation and the promise of restoration.  Unless we fully embrace these biblical remedies then we will NEVER completely resolve our past mistakes, offenses and embarrassing snafus.

In His goodness, God has given us the present, the process and the promise.  Redemption, reconciliation and restoration are the once and for all answers to the overwhelming moral emotions of guilt, shame and embarrassment.

resolve, redemption, reconciliation, restoration

 

Redemption is the only cure for guilt.  Nothing else can remove our guilt.  Nothing else can cover our guilt.  Nothing else can erase our guilt.

Blessed is the one
    whose transgressions are forgiven,
    whose sins are covered.
Blessed is the one
    whose sin the Lord does not count against them
    and in whose spirit is no deceit.

When I kept silent,
    my bones wasted away
    through my groaning all day long.
For day and night
    your hand was heavy on me;
my strength was sapped
    as in the heat of summer.

Then I acknowledged my sin to you
    and did not cover up my iniquity.
I said, “I will confess
    my transgressions to the Lord.”
And you forgave
    the guilt of my sin.  Psalm 32:1-5 NIV

 

The process of reconciliation is not complicated; it is a direct instruction.  When we choose to go down the road of reconciliation there are no short-cuts.  This journey is not for the faint of heart.

“Therefore, if you are offering your gift at the altar and there remember that your brother or sister has something against you, leave your gift there in front of the altar. First go and be reconciled to them; then come and offer your gift.  Matthew 5:23 NIV

 

Realizing the promise of restoration will open us up to a whole new world of God’s blessings.  Realizing (comprehending) God’s moments of restoration will enable us to realize (recognize) our personalized restoration moments.

And after you have suffered a little while, the God of all grace, who has called you to his eternal glory in Christ, will himself restore, confirm, strengthen, and establish you.  1 Peter 5:10 ESV

Note:  Peter denied Christ 3 times, but before Jesus reinstated him into ministry (John 21), he first restored him as a disciple, and in the minds of his fellow disciples. Remember when the Lord told the women at the tomb to “go, tell [the] disciples, and Peter” to meet Him in Galilee?  That was a restoration moment for Peter.  No longer could he doubt himself after his failing, and neither could his fellow disciples.

The present, the process and the promise, although different in principle, have equal properties to completely neutralize the overwhelming stronghold of guilt, shame and embarrassment.  God is good, and He desires to equip us with His holy principles for living an abundant life.  Redemption, Reconciliation and Restoration is how we resolve our past mistakes, offenses and embarrassing snafus.

The remedies of the present, process and promise are so beautifully played out in the story of the woman at the well.  She is just one of the most endearing women in the Bible whose life is profiled in The Day I Met Jesus: The Revealing Diaries of Five Women from the Gospels by Frank Viola and Mary DeMuth.  You can read my review here.

The Day I Met Jesus

 

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Award-winning author Gina Duke is a wife, mom and the Director of Women’s Ministry at her local church. With a B.S. in Organizational Leadership, she is able to bring a clear word for authentic Christian living. Through her book, “Organizing Your Prayer Closet: A New and Life-Changing Way to Pray” (Abingdon Press), she imparts 1 Peter 4:7 with the gift of structured prayer journaling. If you would like to schedule Gina to speak on prayer or host a prayer journaling workshop, click here for more information. You may also follow her on Twitter and Instagram @TheGinaDuke.

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8 Comments

  1. I loved this post. I have been thinking a ton about the beauty of redemption and restoration and reconcilliation during this lent season while studying with SheReads truth lent study. Thanks for your words today!

  2. Hi Gina,

    I enjoyed this post. I think it’s important that people are reminded that reconciliation is a process. Restoration is promised with Jesus and in our emotions and peace. However, sometimes restoration in the relationships with those we have wronged or offended may not be restored in the way we may imagine.

    I know that I wrestled with guilt for most of my life. I thank God that He has freed me from its grasps.

    Great post!

    1. Cara, I completely agree about relationship restoration. Look at Jacob. Even though he reconciled with both Laban and Esau, their relationships were different afterward. For me, just the restoration I feel in my own mind over the matter completely demolishes any lingering guilt and regret. Thanks for stopping by. ~gina

  3. “Redemption, Reconciliation and Restoration is how we resolve our past mistakes, offenses and embarrassing snafus.” Amen! This is the way. We can so move past it. Thank you for encouraging our hearts with these 3 “R’s”. They are much needed Gina. I want to remember them more often. Cheering you from the #RaRalinkup today!

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